leaked snapchats

Leaked Snapchats - 5 Facts you'll never believe

If you have Snapchat on your phone, chances are you use it at least once per day. 100 million people use the app on a daily basis, sending snaps to friends or uploading them to their Story.

That's great, you guys, keep it up. Well, as long you're not sending any nudes.

I'm sorry if this inconveniences you, but with all of the leaks that Snapchat has had in it's history, your snaps are at risk. So far, around 300,000 snaps in total have been leaked since Snapchat's inception, and that's not counting snaps stolen by those bastards using third party apps.

Now, this isn't all Snapchat's fault, although one could argue that they could do with improved security, but if it wasn't for hackers, you'd be in good shape. Unfortunately, we don't live in a slimeball-free world, so your snaps may always be at risk.

We should try to learn from our mistakes and even the mistakes of others in order to keep ourselves from repeating those mistakes, and the leaked Snapchats are no different. In fact, there are 5 things we can all learn from Snapchat's rocky history.

1. Snapchat Is A Huge Target For Hackers

Snapchat has been the victim of hackers on multiple occasions, and for all we know, a ruthless team of hackers (or one guy at his mom's house) are gearing up for another attack right now. In one go, 200,000 pictures were leaked on 4chan, an event now known as the “Snappening"; that's an unprecedented attack, as the iCloud hacks brought only a few thousand pictures in total to light.

Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel has had his share of bad days, such as when a series of emails he sent in college were leaked, revealing privileged frat boy tendencies that would have gotten him fired if he wasn't the brains behind the operation. Hackers have been targeting Snapchat for good reason, as a few hundred million people have it on their phones and a significant number of users use it to send nudes; that's a lot of naked pictures, and clearly, it isn't very hard to leak them.

If Snapchat wants to remain one of the most popular apps ever, it needs to radically improve it's security to ensure there are no backdoors for hackers and no tricks to find old snaps (which is a pretty easy process). Whether a user is sending pics of their cat or their booty, those snaps should be super secure and viewable only by the person receiving that cat or booty pic.

Snapchat needs to step up it's security game real quick, real quick.

2. You Can't Trust Your Friends

When sending a nude, there's always a chance that the person getting it is going to want to save it for later, and they may either screenshot the nude or use a third party app to save it to their device without the sender knowing they did it. If you've ever sent a nude, you'd better hope they didn't save it or share it with anyone.

If you've ever sent a snap where you looked hot, there's a possibility that someone who saw it liked it enough to want to keep it for themselves. Can you trust your friends or those you're hooking up with to keep your nudes safe?

Most people won't do anything slimy like that, but there are people out there who like to keep nudes for revenge porn or to show to friends, and you need to watch out for those guys. If you have any second thoughts about sending someone a nude or suggestive snap because you think they might save it somehow, deny them the sexiness and don't send that snap.

If a nude you took got leaked, imagine how that would disrupt your life; you don't want to have to deal with that mess. If you have to send that nude, make sure whoever is lucky enough to get it won't save it.

3. Snapchat Doesn't Really Care

For an app that features pictures and videos that are supposed to expire within 10 seconds and erase themselves completely, there have been a lot of hacks bringing nudes and other snaps into public eye, splattered all over the Internet. Snapchat's unique feature was supposed to enhance the security of Snapchat, but hackers have proved over and over that those snaps really don't delete themselves, despite what we were lead to believe.

Snapchat has always beefed up it's security after getting hacked, but that doesn't cut it; Snapchat should be one step ahead of hackers, innovating new ways to protect Snapchat users' data and the snaps they send. This app is incredibly popular, but it could go the way of most smartphone apps that start hot but then fade into obscurity if hackers leak more user data or snaps.

A lot of Snapchat users send nudes, but if they feel like their security is at risk, they'll ditch the app and find another alternative that values their privacy more. Snapchat, step your game up.

4. We Love Nudes

Damn, do millennials love to send nudes to each other. 200,000 nudes and other snaps were leaked on 4chan, and if there are any more hacks of people's nudes, expect the number to be six figures; with 400 million snaps being sent every day, hackers are bound to discover a few hundred thousand nudes, if not more.

Millennials are never going to stop sending nudes to each other, so Snapchat might as well focus on improving security to protect those beautiful, very tasteful nudes.

5. Security Will Always Be An Issue Online

As long as the Internet is a thing, hackers will always have something to do, and anyone could be at risk of an attack. Snapchat is a premier app for sexting and sending nudes, and with it's enormous (and growing) user base, it's a huge target for hacks, and as long as Snapchat is around, people will be trying to hack it's servers to find as many nudes as it can.

Safe to say, Snapchat will always be engaged in a battle with hackers, improving it's security to prevent the next leak, but who knows how long it'll be until we see another Snapchat leak. Whenever security online is improved, hackers always seems to find a way around it; your nudes may always be at risk of getting leaked.

If you're worried about hackers or you don't trust your friends on Snapchat, maybe it's time you stopped taking nudes and just save the sexiness for when you're hooking up with someone; you can't hack a memory (yet).